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Digital innovations for better health

3 episodes
  • 1
    Alzheimer's, Parkinson's: “tommorrow, AI will detect disease”
  • 2
    Digital avatars of patients lungs
  • 3
    How to provide access to patients health data
Épisode 1/3
Agnès Vernet, Science journalist
On April 27th, 2022
5 mins reading time
Mounim El Yacoubi
Mounîm A. El Yacoubi
Professor at Télécom SudParis (IP Paris)

Key takeaways

  • AI can help go beyond current tests to provide the medical community with solutions that  are less expensive, less invasive and help refine diagnoses.
  • For Parkinson's disease, a European research project is being conducted by researchers  in collaboration with the Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle épinière.
  • The aim is to be able to detect abnormalities typical of the disease using only a patient's  voice and facial expressions.
  • For Alzheimer's disease, the data could make it possible to follow up on how writing,  walking and voice changes over several months, things that are difficult for a doctor to follow objectively.
  • Health data could one day therefore be collected via watches, fridges, computers in order  to monitor the evolution of risky behaviour and habits.
Épisode 2/3
Agnès Vernet, Science journalist
On April 27th, 2022
3 mins reading time
Cécile Patte
Cécile Patte
Inria engineer in biomechanics, Jeunes Talents France 2020 prize "For women in science" (L'Oréal-Unesco)

Key takeaways

  • To improve treatments, engineers are seeking ways to adapt medical interventions to suit the specific biomechanics of each patient.
  • In order to avoid invasive testing, the MΞDISIM team develops ways to generate digital models of patients’ organs.
  • Cécile Patte is working on a tool to create digital avatars of the lungs of patients suffering from pulmonary fibrosis – a chronic lung disease and one of the long-term effects of Covid-19.
  • These digital replicas will enable doctors to evaluate personalised treatments non-invasively.
Épisode 3/3
On April 27th, 2022
3 mins reading time
Emmanuel Didier (2)
Emmanuel Didier
Sociologist, CNRS Research Director and member of the Maurice Halbwachs Centre at EHESS

Key takeaways

  • The Health Data Hub is a French project with a budget of almost €10 million which aims to centralise all health data in France.
  • This project will make doctors; work easier thanks to the pooling of health data, but it will also open up a new market for companies.
  • The amount of health data in France is colossal: the Sniiram (the national inter-regime information system of the French health insurance system) holds 1.2 billion medical records collected since 2002.
  • However, centralisation poses a problem for some parties who do not want to entrust their databases at the risk of losing the work invested in them. This is the case for the Constance cohort which has a large quantity of data.
  • Other criticisms revolve around the project, notably the very principle of centralisation or the question of hosting, which would be done by Microsoft.

Contributors

Agnès Vernet

Agnès Vernet

Science journalist

After her initial studies in molecular biology, Agnès Vernet trained as a science journalist at ESJ-Lille. For the past 14 years, she has been writing for various media, scientific magazines, professional titles and general press, in France and Switzerland. Since 1st February 2021, she is the elected President of the French association of science journalists (AJSPI).