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Asymmetrical warfare: new strategies on the battlefield

3 episodes
  • 1
    Guerrilla 2.0: Asymmetric warfare in the tech era
  • 2
    Surrogate warfare: has technology opened new doors?
  • 3
    Asymmetric warfare: how to respond to hybrid threats
Épisode 1/3
Richard Robert, Journalist and Author
On October 27th, 2021
4 mins reading time

Key takeaways

  • Asymmetric warfare pits states against non-state entities.
  • These entities have long been defined as being at a technical disadvantage when faced with conventional forces.
  • But today asymmetric warfare relies on technology and its strategic models are not dissimilar to those of start-ups.
Épisode 2/3
Richard Robert, Journalist and Author
On October 27th, 2021
4 mins reading time
Andreas Krieg
Andreas Krieg
Senior lecturer at King's College London and research associate at the Institute of Middle Eastern Studies

Key takeaways

  • Surrogate warfare is a way for states to remain engaged in endless wars, which take place in a grey area between war and peace.
  • It involves outsourcing and delegating armed operations to the market: private military and security companies, rebel groups and militias, non-state actors.
  • Surrogate warfare also plays out with technological tools and information wars.
  • The surrogates also include non-human agents, from robotics to artificial intelligence.
Épisode 3/3
Richard Robert, Journalist and Author
On October 27th, 2021
4 mins reading time
Jérôme Clech
Jérôme Clech
Research engineer at ESDR3C (CNAM) and Lecturer at Sciences Po Paris

Key takeaways

  • Hybrid threats come from states that add information manipulation to conventional warfare, but also from hybrid, criminal or terrorist entities.
  • Taking these hybrid threats into account calls for hybrid responses: the “war before the war”.
  • “Augmented prevention” would combine the sword (armed drones, cyber offensives, and offensives in the broader “cyber” field) to act externally and the shield (cyber security and security through cyber) to protect our territories.
  • Europe needs to increase its capabilities in this area, especially as we now need to update our responses in anticipation of these threats: the challenges posed are technological, legal, and ethical.